How to Expand the ISO Range on Your Canon EOS 6D. Iso фотоаппарат canon


How to Expand the ISO Range on Your Canon EOS 6D

  1. Photography
  2. Cameras
  3. Canon Camera
  4. How to Expand the ISO Range on Your Canon EOS 6D

By Doug Sahlin

You can extend the ISO range of your Canon EOS 6D to give you a range from ISO 50 to ISO 102400. The extended ISO range will definitely enable you to capture images in very dim lighting conditions, but there is a payback in the form of some pretty gnarly digital noise.

On the low end of the spectrum, ISO 50, you’ll be able to shoot at slower shutter speeds, which is a definite bonus when you photograph beautiful waterfalls. To extend the ISO range of your camera:

  1. Press the Menu button.

    The last-used menu command is displayed.

  2. Use the Multi-controller to navigate to the Shooting Settings 3 tab and then use the Multi-controller or the Quick Control dial to highlight ISO Speed Settings.

  3. Press Set.

    The ISO Speed Settings options are displayed. Note that you can manually set the ISO using the first menu command. Although, it’s easy to question the wisdom of that command when you can quickly set the ISO using a button and dial. (Perhaps that command exists for gluttons for punishment who have used menu-concentric cameras in the past. You know who you are.)

  4. Use the Multi-controller or Quick Control dial to highlight ISO Speed Range and then press Set.

    The Minimum ISO setting box is highlighted.

  5. Press Set.

    An arrow appears above and below the current minimum setting. That’s right, if you wanted to, you could increase the minimum setting. You always get the best-quality images shooting with the lowest possible ISO setting.

  6. Use the Multi-controller to select 50.

    A dialog box appears, showing you that the ISO setting of 50 will appear as L when you select it. You’re also warned that the low ISO setting will be bumped to 100 when you capture video.

  7. Press Set.

    The change is applied. If you only want to change the minimum ISO setting go to Step 10.

  8. Use the Multi-controller right to highlight the current maximum ISO setting and then press Set.

    An arrow appears above and below the current maximum ISO setting. If you’re not happy with the results you’re getting at the current maximum ISO settings, press the Multi-controller down to select a lower maximum ISO setting.

  9. To increase the maximum ISO setting, press the top of the Multi-controller once to select h2(102400) and a second time to select h3(512400). After highlighting the desired setting, press Set.

    The change is applied.

  10. Use the Multi-controller highlight OK and then press Set.

    The changes are applied and the ISO settings you have to work with have been extended.

In addition to expanding the ISO range, you can specify the Auto ISO Range by choosing that command from the ISO menu. If you use Auto ISO, you may find it useful to specify the minimum and maximum ISO that can be used when you let the camera automatically choose the ISO setting.

Another option you may find useful is setting the minimum shutter speed that will be used when Auto ISO is in effect. This prevents using an ISO that would result in a slow shutter speed, potentially causing a blurred picture. This option is set to Auto by default, however, you can modify it by choosing Min Shutter Spd under the ISO Speed Settings menu.

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How to Control ISO on a Canon EOS 70D

  1. Photography
  2. Cameras
  3. Canon Camera
  4. How to Control ISO on a Canon EOS 70D

By Julie Adair King

The ISO setting on your Canon EOS 70D controls how sensitive the image sensor is to light. At higher ISO values, you need less light to expose an image. Remember the downside to raising ISO, however: The higher the ISO, the greater the possibility of noisy images.

In the fully automatic exposure modes, the camera controls ISO. In the advanced exposure modes, you can use auto ISO adjustment or select a specific setting. You also can specify limits for the camera to follow when you use auto ISO adjustment.

With the Canon 70D, you can view the ISO setting in all three displays, as shown in the following figure. To adjust the setting, you have these options:

  • ISO button: Press the ISO button (top of the camera, just above the LCD panel). The ISO value becomes activated in the panel and viewfinder, and the screen shown in the following figure appears on the monitor. Use the Main dial, Quick Control dial, or Multi-controller to adjust the setting, or if you’re in a touchscreen mood, drag your finger along the scale or tap the left and right arrows. Close out the process by pressing the Set button or by tapping the return arrow on the monitor.

    Pressing the ISO button brings up this ISO selection screen.

    While the selection screen is displayed, you can tap the Info icon or press the Info button to quickly select Auto ISO mode.

  • Quick Control screen: After shifting to the Quick Control screen, highlight the ISO setting and then rotate the Main dial or Quick Control dial to adjust the setting. Or, to access the selection screen shown in the figure above, tap the ISO setting or press the Set button.

  • Shooting Menu 3: Select ISO Speed Settings, as shown on the left in the figure below, and then choose ISO Speed, as shown on the right, to set the ISO value you want to use.

    Shooting Menu 3 offers additional ISO setup options.

The other menu options on the screen shown on the right in the figure enable you to modify the range of ISO values available and to control how the camera selects an ISO setting when you use the Auto ISO option. The menu options work as follows:

  • ISO Speed Range: By default, you can select from ISO values ranging from 100 to 12800. But via this menu option, you can select a higher minimum setting and expand the maximum value to as high as 25600, as illustrated in the following figure. After choosing the menu option, highlight either value to display controls for adjusting the value. (The Maximum setting is selected in the figure.) A couple of fine points to note:

    • By default, the maximum ISO value the camera uses for movies is 6400, even if you select the 12800 setting via the menu. However, by setting the Maximum value to 12800/H, you give the camera permission to jack up the ISO to 12800 for movies. (The H stands for high, which should be a reminder to expect noise in your movie.)

    • The maximum setting for still shooting is ISO 25600, which is also tagged with an H. For movies, the camera automatically selects the 12800/H setting when the H 25600 option is in force.

    • If you enable Highlight Tone Priority, the lowest possible ISO setting becomes 200. You also lose access to the top ISO setting (H 26500).

  • Auto ISO Range: Use this option to set the minimum and maximum ISO settings you want the camera to use when you go with Auto ISO adjustment.

  • Min. Shutter Speed: This setting relates to shooting in the P and Av exposure modes. If you leave the setting at Auto (the default), the camera automatically shifts the ISO so that the value isn’t lower than the shutter speed. You also can select a specific shutter speed, in which case the camera shifts to auto ISO adjustment only if the shutter speed falls to your selected value or lower. This setting isn’t applied when you use flash, however. Also, the camera will choose a slower shutter speed than you designate if that’s the only way to produce a good exposure.

In Auto ISO mode, the Shooting Settings display, LCD panel, and Live View display initially show Auto (or A) as the ISO value. But when you press the shutter button halfway, the value changes to show you the ISO setting the camera selected. You also see the selected value rather than Auto in the viewfinder. Note: When you view shooting data during playback, you may see a value reported that isn’t on the list of “official” ISO settings — ISO 320, for example. This happens because in Auto mode, the camera can select values all along the available ISO range, whereas if you select a specific ISO setting, you’re restricted to specific notches within the range.

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Comparison of Canon EOS digital cameras

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  (Redirected from Comparison of canon eos digital cameras)

The following tables provide general information as well as a comparison of technical specifications for a number of Canon EOS digital cameras.

General information[edit]

Model Image processor Sensor format Megapixels Min ISO Max ISO Autofocus points Viewfinder

magnification,

coverage

Display

size,pixels

(ratio)

Touch

screen

Live view Max FPS Storage Release date Weight (kg) Dimensions, WxHxD (mm) Video Main Battery Model Image processor Sensor format Megapixels Min ISO Max ISO Autofocus points Viewfinder

magnification, coverage

Display

size, pixels

(ratio)

Touch

screen

Live view Max FPS Storage Release date Weight (kg) Dimensions, WxHxD (mm) Video Main Battery
1Ds 1 DIGIC Full-frame CMOS 11.4 50 1250 45 0.70×, 100% 2.0", 0120k No No 3 CF 2002Q4 1.265 156 × 158 × 80 - NP-E3
1Ds Mk II 2 DIGIC II Full-frame CMOS 16.7 50 3200 45 0.70×, 100% 2.0", 0230k No No 4.5 CF, SD 2004Q4 1.215 156 × 158 × 80 - NP-E3
1Ds Mk III 3D Dual DIGIC III Full-frame CMOS 21.1 50 3200 45 0.76×, 100% 3.0", 0230k No Yes 5.0 CF, SD 2007Q4 1.210 156 × 160 × 80 - LP-E4
1D 1 DIGIC APS-H CCD 4 100 3200 45 0.72×, 100% 2.0", 0120k No No 8.0 CF 2001Q4 1.250 156 × 158 × 80 - NP-E3
1D Mk II 2 DIGIC II APS-H CMOS 8.2 50 3200 45 0.72×, 100% 2.0", 0230k No No 8.5 CF, SD 2004Q2 1.220 156 × 158 × 80 - NP-E3
1D Mk II N 2 DIGIC II APS-H CMOS 8.2 50 3200 45 0.72×, 100% 2.5", 0230k No No 8.5 CF, SD 2005Q3 1.225 156 × 158 × 80 - NP-E3
1D Mk III 3D Dual DIGIC III APS-H CMOS 10.1 50 6400 45 0.76×, 100% 3.0", 0230k No Yes 10 CF, SD 2007Q1 1.155 156 × 157 × 80 - LP-E4
1D Mk IV 4D Dual DIGIC 4 APS-H CMOS 16.1 50 102,400 45 0.76×, 100% 3.0", 0920k No Yes 10 CF, SD 2009Q4 1.180 156 × 157 × 80 1080p30 LP-E4
1D X 5+D Dual DIGIC 5+ Full-frame CMOS 18.1 50 204,800 61 0.76×, 100% 3.2", 1040k No Yes 14 CF (×2) 2012Q2 1.530 158 × 164 × 83 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E4N
1D C 5+D Dual DIGIC 5+ Full-frame CMOS 18.1 50 204,800 61 0.76×, 100% 3.2", 1040k No Yes 14 CF (×2) 2012Q2 1.530 158 × 164 × 83 4K, 1080p60, 720p60 LP-E4N
1D X Mk II 5+D Dual DIGIC 6+ Full-frame CMOS 20.2 50 409,600 61 0.76×, 100% 3.2", 1620k Fixed Yes 16 CFast, CF 2016Q1 1.530 158 × 164 × 83 4Kp60, 1080p120 LP-E19
5D 2 DIGIC II Full-frame CMOS 12.8 50 3200 9 0.71×, 96% 2.5", 0230k No No 3 CF 2005Q3 0.81 152 × 113 × 75 - BP-511A
5D Mk II 4 DIGIC 4 Full-frame CMOS 21.1 50 25,600 9 0.71×, 98% 3.0", 0920k No Yes 3.9 CF 2008Q4 0.81 152 × 113 × 75 1080p30, 480p30 LP-E6
5D Mk III 5+ DIGIC 5+ Full-frame CMOS 22.3 50 102,400 61 0.71×, 100% 3.2", 1040k No Yes 6 CF, SD 2012Q1 0.95 152 × 116 × 76 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E6
5D Mk IV 6+ DIGIC 6+ Full-frame CMOS 30.1 50 102,400 61 0.71×, 100% 3.2", 1620k Fixed Yes 7 CF, SDXC (UHS-I) 2016Q3 0.889 151 × 116 × 76 4K30, 1080p60, 720p120 LP-E6N
5Ds / 5Ds R 6D Dual DIGIC 6 Full-frame CMOS 50.6 50 12,800 61 0.71×, 100% 3.2", 1040k No Yes 5 CF, SDXC (UHS-I) 2015Q2 0.93 152 × 116 × 76 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E6
6D 5+ DIGIC 5+ Full-frame CMOS 20.2 50 102,400 11 0.71×, 97% 3.0", 1040k No Yes 4.5 SDXC (UHS-I) 2012Q4 0.77 145 × 111 × 71 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E6
6D Mk II 7 DIGIC 7 Full-frame CMOS 26.2 50 102,400 45 0.71×, 98% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 6.5 SDXC (UHS-I) 2017Q3 0.765 144 × 110.5 × 74.8 1080p60, 720p60 LP-E6N
7D 4D Dual DIGIC 4 APS-C CMOS 18 100 12,800 19 1.0×, 100% 3.0", 0920k No Yes 8 CF 2009Q3 0.82 148 × 111 × 74 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E6
7D Mk II 6D Dual DIGIC 6 APS-C CMOS 20.2 100 51,200 65 1.0×, 100% 3.0", 1040k No Yes 10 CF, SDXC (UHS-I) 2014Q3 0.91 149 × 112 × 78 1080p60, 720p60 LP-E6N
D30 APS-C CMOS 3.1 100 1600 3 0.88×, 95% 1.8", 0114k No No 3 CF 2000Q2 0.78 150 × 107 × 75 - BP-511,BP-511A
D60 0 APS-C CMOS 6.3 100 1000 3 0.88×, 95% 1.8", 0114k No No 3 CF 2002Q1 0.78 150 × 107 × 75 - BP-511,BP-511A
10D 1 DIGIC APS-C CMOS 6.3 100 3200 7 0.88×, 95% 1.8", 0118k No No 3 CF 2003Q1 0.79 150 × 108 × 75 - BP-511, BP-512
20D 2 DIGIC II APS-C CMOS 8.2 100 3200 9 0.90×, 95% 1.8", 0118k No No 5 CF 2004Q3 0.685 144 × 106 × 72 - BP-511A, BP-511, BP-512
20Da 2 DIGIC II APS-C CMOS 8.2 100 3200 9 0.90×, 95% 1.8", 0118k No Yes 5 CF 2005Q1 0.685 144 × 106 × 72 - BP-511A, BP-511, BP-512
30D 2 DIGIC II APS-C CMOS 8.2 100 3200 9 0.90×, 95% 2.5", 0230k No No 5 CF 2006Q1 0.7 144 × 106 × 74 - BP-511A, BP-514, BP-511, BP-512
40D 3 DIGIC III APS-C CMOS 10.1 100 3200 9 0.95×, 95% 3.0", 0230k No Yes 6.5 CF 2007Q3 0.74 146 × 108 × 74 - BP-511A, BP-514, BP-511, BP-512
50D 4 DIGIC 4 APS-C CMOS 15.1 100 12,800 9 0.95×, 95% 3.0", 0920k No Yes 6.3 CF 2008Q4 0.73 146 × 108 × 74 Via open source (Magic Lantern) BP-511A, BP-514, BP-511, BP-512
60D 4 DIGIC 4 APS-C CMOS 18 100 12,800 9 0.95×, 96% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 5.3 SDXC 2010Q3 0.755 145 × 106 × 79 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E6
60Da 4 DIGIC 4 APS-C CMOS 18 100 12,800 9 0.95×, 96% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 5.3 SDXC 2012Q2 0.755 145 × 106 × 79 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E6
70D 5+ DIGIC 5+ APS-C CMOS 20.2 100 25,600 19 0.95×, 98% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 7 SDXC (UHS-I) 2013Q3 0.755 139 × 104.3 × 78.5 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E6
77D 7 DIGIC 7 APS-C CMOS 24.2 100 25,600 45 0.82×, 95% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 6.0 SDXC (UHS-I) 2017Q1 0.540 131 × 99.9 × 76.2 1080p60, 720p60 LP-E17N
80D 6 DIGIC 6 APS-C CMOS 24.2 100 25,600 45 0.95×, 100% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 7 SDXC (UHS-I) 2016Q2 0.730 139 × 105.2 × 78.5 1080p60, 720p60 LP-E6N
300DDigital Rebel 1 DIGIC APS-C CMOS 6.3 100 1600 7 0.80×, 95% 1.8", 0118k No No 2.5 CF 2003Q3 0.694 142 × 99 × 72 - BP-511/512
350DRebel XT 2 DIGIC II APS-C CMOS 8.0 100 1600 7 0.80×, 95% 1.8", 0115k No No 3 CF 2005Q1 0.54 127 × 94 × 64 - NB-2LH
400DRebel XTi 2 DIGIC II APS-C CMOS 10.1 100 1600 9 0.80×, 95% 2.5", 0230k No No 3 CF 2007Q1 0.51 127 × 94 × 65 - NB-2LH
450DRebel XSi 3 DIGIC III APS-C CMOS 12.2 100 1600 9 0.87×, 95% 3.0", 0230k No Yes 3.5 SDHC 2008Q2 0.475 129 × 98 × 62 via open source software to computer LP-E5
500DRebel T1i 4 DIGIC 4 APS-C CMOS 15.1 100 12,800 9 0.87×, 95% 3.0", 0920k No Yes 3.4 SDHC 2009Q1 0.48 129 × 98 × 62 1080p20, 720p30 LP-E5
550DRebel T2i 4 DIGIC 4 APS-C CMOS 18 100 12,800 9 0.87×, 95% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

No Yes 3.7 SDXC 2010Q1 0.53 129 × 98 × 62 1080p25, 720p50 LP-E8
600DRebel T3i 4 DIGIC 4 APS-C CMOS 18 100 12,800 9 0.85×, 95% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 3.7 SDXC 2011Q1 0.57 133 × 100 × 80 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E8
650DRebel T4i 5 DIGIC 5 APS-C CMOS 18 100 25,600 9 0.85×, 95% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 5.0 SDXC (UHS-I) 2012Q2 0.58 134 × 100 × 79 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E8
700DRebel T5i 5 DIGIC 5 APS-C CMOS 18 100 25,600 9 0.85×, 95% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 5.0 SDXC (UHS-I) 2013Q1 0.58 134 × 100 × 79 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E8
750DRebel T6i 6 DIGIC 6 APS-C CMOS 24.2 100 25,600 19 0.82×, 95% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 5.0 SDXC (UHS-I) 2015Q2 0.555 132 × 101 × 78 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E17
760DRebel T6s 6 DIGIC 6 APS-C CMOS 24.2 100 25,600 19 0.82×, 95% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 5.0 SDXC (UHS-I) 2015Q2 0.565 132 × 101 × 78 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E17
800DRebel T7i 6 DIGIC 7 APS-C CMOS 24.2 100 25,600 45 0.82×, 95% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 6.0 SDXC (UHS-I) 2017Q2 0.532 131 × 100 × 76 1080p60, 720p60 LP-E17
1000DRebel XS 3 DIGIC III APS-C CMOS 10.1 100 1600 7 0.81×, 95% 2.5", 0230k No Yes 3 SDHC 2008Q3 0.45 126 × 98 × 62 via open source software to computer LP-E5
1100DRebel T3 4 DIGIC 4 APS-C CMOS 12.1 100 6400 9 0.80×, 95% 2.7", 0230k No Yes 3 SDXC 2011Q1 0.495 130 × 100 × 78 720p30 LP-E10
1200DRebel T5 4 DIGIC 4 APS-C CMOS 18 100 12,800 9 0.80×, 95% 3.0", 0460k No Yes 3 SDXC 2014Q1 0.48 130 × 100 × 88 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E10
1300DRebel T6 4 DIGIC 4+ APS-C CMOS 18 100 12,800 9 0.80×, 95% 3.0", 0 920k No Yes 3 SDXC 2016Q2 0.48 130 × 101 × 88 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E10
2000DRebel T7 4 DIGIC 4+ APS-C CMOS 24.1 100 12,800 9 0.80×, 95% 3.0", 0 920k No Yes 3 SDXC 2018Q2 0.475 129 × 101.3 × 77.6 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E10
4000DRebel T100 4 DIGIC 4+ APS-C CMOS 18 100 12,800 9 0.80×, 95% 2.7", 0 230k No Yes 3 SDXC 2018Q2 0.436 129 × 101.6 × 77.1 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E10
100DRebel SL1 5 DIGIC 5 APS-C CMOS 18 100 25,600 9 0.87×, 95% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Fixed Yes 4.0 SDXC (UHS-I) 2013Q1 0.41 117 × 91 × 69 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E12
200DRebel SL2 7 DIGIC 7 APS-C CMOS 24.2 100 51,200 9 0.82×, 95% 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 5.0 SDXC (UHS-I) 2017Q3 0.453 122.4 × 92.6 × 69.8 1080p60, 720p60 LP-E17
M 5 DIGIC 5 APS-C CMOS 18 100 25,600 31 (Max) - 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Fixed Yes (only) 4.3 SDXC (UHS-I) 2012Q3 0.262 108.6 × 66.5 × 32.3 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E12
M2 DIGIC 5 APS-C CMOS 18 100 25,600 31 (Max) - 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Fixed Yes (only) 4.6 SDXC (UHS-I) 2013Q4 0.274 108.6 × 66.5 × 32.3 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E12
M3 6 DIGIC 6 APS-C CMOS 24.2 100 25,600 49 - 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Fixed Yes (only) 4.2 SDXC (UHS-I) 2015Q1 0.366 111 × 68 × 44 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E17
M5 6 DIGIC 7 APS-C CMOS 24.2 100 25,600 49 electronic,

2,360k pixels

3.2", 1.62M

3:2

Fixed Yes 9; 7 with autofocus SDXC (UHS-I) 2016Q4 0.427 115.6 × 89.2 × 60.6 1080p60, 720p60 LP-E17
M6 6 DIGIC 7 APS-C CMOS 24.2 100 25,600 49 - 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Tilting Yes (only) 9; 7 with autofocus SDXC (UHS-I) 2017Q2 0.39 112.0 × 68.0 × 44.5 1080p60, 720p60 LP-E17
M50 6 DIGIC 8 APS-C CMOS 24.1 100 51,200 143 (Max) electronic,

2,360k pixels

3.0", 1040k

3:2

Articulated Yes 10; 7.4 with autofocus SDXC (UHS-I) 2018Q2 0.387 116.3 × 88.1 × 58.7 4K25, 1080p60, 720p120 LP-E12
M10 6 DIGIC 6 APS-C CMOS 18 100 25,600 49 - 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Tilting Yes (only) 4.6 SD, SDHC or SDXC 2015Q4 0.301 108 × 67 × 35 1080p30, 720p60 LP-E12
M100 6 DIGIC 7 APS-C CMOS 24 100 25,600 49 - 3.0", 1040k

3:2

Tilting Yes (only) 6.1 SD, SDHC or SDXC 2017Q3 0.302 108.2 × 67,1 × 35,1 1080p60, 720p60 LP-E12

See also[edit]

en.wikipedia.org

How to Control ISO on a Canon EOS Rebel T3 Series Camera

  1. Photography
  2. Cameras
  3. Canon Camera
  4. How to Control ISO on a Canon EOS Rebel T3 Series Camera

By Julie Adair King

Your camera’s ISO setting controls how sensitive the image sensor is to light. At a camera’s higher ISO values, you need less light to expose an image correctly. If you want to control ISO with your Canon Rebel T3 or T3i, set the camera to one of the five advanced exposure modes: P, Tv, Av, M, or A-DEP.

Remember the downside to raising ISO, however: The higher the ISO, the greater the possibility of noisy images.

In Scene Intelligent Auto (Full Auto on a T3), Creative Auto, Flash Off, and the scene modes (Portrait, Landscape, and so on), the camera controls ISO. But in the advanced exposure modes, you have the following ISO choices:

  • Select a specific ISO setting. Normally, you can choose ISO 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, or 6400. But you can push ISO up one notch, to ISO 12800, if you’re okay with the added noise that results.

  • Let the camera choose (Auto ISO). You can ask the camera to adjust ISO for you if you prefer. And you can specify the highest ISO setting that you want the camera to use, up to ISO 6400. Set the top ISO limit via the ISO Auto setting on Shooting Menu 3.

You can view the current ISO setting in the upper-right corner of the Shooting Settings screen. You can also monitor the ISO in the viewfinder display. During Live View shooting, the setting appears at the bottom of the screen unless you choose the display mode that hides all the shooting data.

To adjust the setting, you have two or three options (depending whether you’re using the T3 or the T3i):

  • Press the ISO button on top of the camera (for the T3i) or the up cross key (for the T3). Highlight your choice and press Set.

  • Use the Quick Control screen. After displaying the Shooting Settings screen, press the Quick Control button to shift to Quick Control mode and then highlight the ISO setting. Then either rotate the Main dial to cycle through the available ISO settings or press Set. If you take the second approach, highlight your ISO setting and press Set again.

  • Reconfigure the Flash button to act as an ISO button (T3 only). You can set the Flash button to act as an ISO button for fast ISO changes.

In Auto ISO mode, the Shooting Settings display and Live View display initially show Auto as the ISO value, as you would expect. But when you press the shutter button halfway, which initiates exposure metering, the value changes to show you the ISO setting the camera has selected. You also see the selected value rather than Auto in the viewfinder. Note: When you view shooting data during playback, you may see a value reported that isn’t on the list of “official” ISO settings. This happens because in Auto mode, the camera can select values all along the available ISO range, whereas if you select a specific ISO setting, you’re restricted to specific notches within the range.

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Canon 5D

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Canon 5D13 MP Full-Frame, 3 FPS, 2.5" LCD (2005-2008, replaced by the 5D Mark II, 5D Mark III and 5DS)

Introduction    Specifications    Performance    Compared    Recommendations

Canon 5D (31.9 oz. /904g with battery and card, I paid $3,300 new and now sells for about $400 used). enlarge. This free website's biggest source of support is when you use this link to them at eBay, or any of these links, when you get anything, regardless of where you live. Thanks!

Sample Image File

Yosemite Valley. Canon 5D, 16-35mm f/2.8 L II with Tiffen 812 warming filter at 16mm, f/11 @ 1/80 (Av mode), -0.3 exposure compensation, ISO 100, hand-held (tech details). Exactly as shot in JPG. Camera-original file © (6MB).

More Canon 5D example photos: Eastern Sierra   Death Valley    Rt 66

NEW: 2012 DSLR Comparison 18 April 2012

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Nikon D3X, D3, D40, and Canon 5D Mark II, 5D and SD700 Sharpness Comparison 13 January 2009

Nikon D3X, D3, and Canon 5D and 5D Mark II ISO 3,200 Comparison 09 January 2009

Canon 1Ds Mk III vs. Canon 5D vs. Nikon D3 28 July 2008

20x30" print comparison. The 5D wins!

Nikon D3 vs. D700 vs. Canon 5D 10 July 2008

16mm Lens Shootout 2008

 

December 2015, May 2012, August 2010, June 2008       Canon Reviews   Canon Lenses   All Reviews

 

Introduction    back to top

Introduction    Specifications    Performance    Compared    Recommendations

The Canon 5D is sharper than the $5,000 Nikon D3 or D700, and the 5D sells for about $800 used.

The Canon 5D was the world's best portrait and landscape camera for under $8,000 in its day, and today, still a steal. The images look fantastic, and it runs forever on a single charge. Unlike pro cameras, it's light enough to want to take in your backpack everywhere to bring back extraordinary images.

How good is it? The 5D doesn't handle as fast as a Nikon and isn't built anywhere near as tough as a pro Nikon, but if your subject holds still and you aren't shooting in the rain, the 5D easily can exceed the technical quality of anything from Nikon. Here's a snapshot made on the lowest JPG setting. Click the image for the original 12MP file from my 5D.

On 17 September 2008, the 5D was been replaced by the EOS 5D Mark II, which takes the same pictures, but has far superior ergonomics and a fantastic LCD. The MSRP of the Mark II was only $2,699, about the same as the 5D. Today, this 5D is a steal used.

I love my Canon 5D. I love it so much that I've been so busy shooting with it these past 18 months instead of writing about it. (The same applies to my excellent 15mm fisheye and original model 14mm f/2.8, both of which also are great.) Today is overcast, so I guess it's time to write it up once and for all.

I'm a sucker for a bargain, so I bought my 5D on November 15th, 2006 from Adorama back when Canon was offering a $600 rebate, so long as you also got an appropriate lens. I thought the rebate signaled a new model, but I was wrong and lucked out.

I've made about 15,000 shots on my 5D (or maybe it's 25,000). I love its vivid color (when set to my standard of +3 saturation) and its pure image quality. When printed big (much bigger than 12 x 18") its image quality is better than even my Nikon D3, a news and sports camera. This all comes from the Full Frame Advantage. Bigger sensors or film easily make for higher technical quality images.

Look at the example files to see what I saw that had me running out to go shoot with the 5D instead of writing about it.

When my Nikon D3 hits my hands it probably will have the same image quality and better ergonomics, but costs double and weighs a lot more. If you want a 5D, I wouldn't wait around. Fall 2007 colors are here, and my 5D is the best I've got before the leaves blow off the trees.

 

Advantages of the 5D

My 5D has immaculate image quality beyond anything in smaller formats. (see examples)

This means for big prints, there's nothing but embarrassing comparisons to my Nikon D200. Of course none of this matters unless you get the far more important basics of lighting and composition out of the way first, and then it only matters if you print large and look too closely, but for those of you who care, just get a 5D.

Not only is resolution and sharpness far beyond any smaller format camera due to the practical limitations I discuss in the Full Frame Advantage, but if you want no noise, the 5D goes down to ISO 50! I like this because it matches Fuji Velvia when I'm shooting both at the same time.

My 5D seems to have limitless battery life: I get over 1,000 shots per charge.

 

Disadvantages of the 5D

I prefer the ergonomics and usability of my Nikons.

The 5D is klunkier and slower to give results. It has no Auto ISO, so I have to jack the ISO around manually for each shot, although I can do it without removing my eye from the finder.

Its body may look nice, but doesn't fit my hand. My D200 fits like a glove, while my fingers hurt after holding the 5D for any length of time.

The 5D has controls in places not intuitive or easy to touch. For instance, I have to use a second hand to hit the depth-of-field preview since its on the wrong side. It's easy to shoot my Nikons with one hand, but difficult and painful to try to do the same with my 5D.

Dim and color-innacurate LCD (same as Canon 30D.) The $400 (body) Nikon D40 is far better.

Slow data transfer via the 5D's USB port.

 

Things I'd change in my 5D:

The worst part of my 5D is its vomity-greenish-cyan LCD. Colors look like crap on my 5D's LCD, so I have to guess while shooting. Colors desaturate as they get brighter on the LCD, even though the actual recorded image is fine. It's as if the video circuitry is clipping the highlights of each channel before they get to the LCD; I'll have to experiment - but whatever the reason, it's much worse than the Canon point and shoots! The LCD is also of lower contrast than the new Nikons. I use my LCD to set color and exposure as I shoot which gives me printer-perfect JPGs directly out of my 5D without needing to jerk around in RAW, so I wish the LCD was up to it. I fly blind, as I did with film, with my 5D.

I'd love it to be a joy to hold and use, like the Nikons whose industrial design is done by Giorgetto Giugiaro.

I'd love to have an easier way to set manual custom white balances, something Canon does extremely well on their compacts and the XL video cameras, but requires way too many button presses on their SLRs.

I'd love to have smart programmable Auto ISO.

I'd love to have faster data transfer via the USB port, and preferably, a Firewire 800 port.

I'd love for the 5D to pop up as a drive instead of only being able to download from it through software.

I'd love to be able set my camera to add my © notice to metadata directly in-camera without needing to talk to the camera with a computer.

I'd love more visible finder readouts. The finder digits of my 5D are too skinny and too dim to read in bright light. (my Nikon D40's numerical readouts are far better.)

I'd love to have a modern camera with all the information readouts and controls on the back where I can see them, not on a top LCD like old film cameras. I can't see the top of a camera when it's on a tall tripod.

I'd love a new flash exposure control system that nails every flash exposure perfectly as my Nikons do.

I'd love it if Canon gave us more C1, C2, C3, etc. settings on the selector dial, each of which I could program myself. The one C setting on my 5D is pure genius. Having more of them would let me shoot much faster.

Canon 5D vs Nikon D3 at High ISOs 07 December 2007

Canon 5D vs Nikon D3 Sharpness Comparison 05 December 2007.

Canon 5D vs other DSLR High ISO Comparison 04 December 2007

DSLR High ISO Shoot-Out 03 October 2007

The Full Frame Advantage

Cleaning and Canon Factory Service 28 September 2007

Compared to the Nikon D200

Compared to the Rebel XTi, Nikon D200, D80, D70, D50 and D40

Compared to the 1D Mk-II N

Compared to the 20D

 

Users Guide

I may write one of my complete, plain English User's Guides for the 5D, but since the 5D is the 99% same camera as the 30D, see my Canon 30D User's Guide. Almost everything, including the menus and most of the custom functions, is identical.

 

Improved Canon 5D LCD

My Canon 5D, bought around November 2006 when Canon was giving a $600 rebate and with a serial number beginning with 1, has the worst, dimmest and most off-color LCD I've ever used, just like the 30D. I hear that the latest 5Ds, as of at least December 2007, have an improved LCD, with serial numbers beginning with 2. I sure hope so! Yay!

 

Specifications with commentary  back to top

Introduction    Specifications    Performance    Compared    Recommendations

Lenses

EF only. The smaller EF-S lenses like the 10-22mm, 18-55mm and 17-85mm can't cover the 5D's extra-large sensor. The large sensor means the 16-35mm, 20-35mm, 17-40mm, 14mm and 15mm fisheye cover huge angles, the whole point of buying a 5D. Forget manual focus lenses with an adapter; there is no exposure metering and it just gets silly.

 

AF

9 segments. The 5D uses the same AF sensors and positions as the 20D and 30D, which means that the sensors are much closer together in the center compared to the smaller cameras. I like the layout, since I'm more likely to find a sensor where I want it. There are also six secret, hidden AF sensors to help with moving subjects. Canon AF has always worked great; it's why pro sports shooters switched to Canon in the 1990s and have never returned to Nikon. I find the accuracy and consistency of AF is better than it is on my Rebel XTi, important if you use fast lenses.

 

AF Assist Light

None, unless you use an external flash.

 

Viewfinder

-3 to +1 diopters, adjusts with knob. Canon makes 10 different slip-on lenses to cover the range from -4 to +3 diopters if your eyesight demands it.

 

Focus Screens

Two optional screens are available. The Ee-A is standard. The Ee-D adds a grid (most Nikons allow you to turn the grid on and off for free without having to pay for an extra screen and risk the dirt and damage inherent in changing them), and the Ee-S screen, which is designed with a different focus surface optimized for manual focus of fast lenses. No, I have no idea why the funny E-I-E-I-O nomenclature for the screens. See also my page on Canon 5D Focus Screens.

 

Flash

Lacks built-in flash. E-TTL II autoflash control with EX-series Speedlite.

 

Flash Sync

1/200.

Non-polarized PC Flash terminal as well as hot shoe, less than 250V. OK to use both at once. More here about flash sync.

 

Shutter

30s - 1/8,000 without flash. 1/200 maximum with flash in the usual modes. Bulb counts up seconds on the top LCD during exposure, up to 999 seconds (15 minutes). Canon claims "durability tested" and "shutter life" of 100,000 frames, which is not a guarantee. Pro cameras tend to claim about 150,000 cycles and cheaper cameras don't say. No big deal, at least Canon has the guts to list a number.

 

Sensor

oversize 24 x 36 mm CMOS. Reminiscent of 35 mm double-frame film. Sensor really is 35.8 x 23.9mm.

 

Pixel Pitch

8.2 microns.

 

ISO

100 - 1,600 in third stops.

Set Custom Function 08 (MENU > Custom Functions (C.Fn) > 08: ISO Expansion: ON) and you also will get ISO 50, called "L," and ISO 3,200, called "H." I almost always shoot at ISO 50 just because it feels right. Sadly there is no choice of third stops where you most need them, which is between ISO 1,600 and ISO 3,200. There is also no ISO 64 or ISO 80, which is good since they'd just get in the way along with all the other third stops. I only use third stops at the very highest ISOs, which is the one place the 5D lacks them. Oh well.

 

Image Size

12.8 MP: 4,368 x 2,912 pixels. Also 3,168 x 2,112 and 2,496 x 1,664 settings.

 

Color-Contrast etc. Presets

Three user-defined custom settings (presets). These presets are called "Picture Style" and store sharpening, contrast, saturation and hue. I use Menu > Custom Functions (C.Fn) > 02 (SET button function) 2: Change Picture Style, and now all I do is tap the SET button while shooting and I can select among any of my own three, or any of a dozen other ones, to change to known presets of color and contrast etc, even black-and-white, almost instantly.

 

Complete Camera State Preset

One setting, the C on the dial. Set everything about the camera's state by MENU > Register Camera Settings, and recall them at the C on the top left dial. I love this! I set that for use in my studio under strobes, so it recalls my manual white balance for my strobes, the ISO and contrast and exposure and everything, every time.

 

Trick Modes

Crafty black-and-white modes allow preselection of color filters, without needing the filter!

 

Frame Rate

3 FPS, which is slow as DSLRs go.

 

Buffer

60 JPG, 17 RAW or 12 RAW + JPG. This is huge, which means I doubt anyone will ever be able to fill it at 3 FPS.

 

LCD Screen

Crappy 2.5," 230,000 pixels.

Claimed 170 degree horizontal and vertical angle of view, quite an advance if true. Other LCDs require you look at them from just the right angle to see them properly. Dim and inaccurate color compared to any of my Nikons.

 

RGB Histogram

YES, but smaller and less informative than the ones on my Nikons.

 

Data Interface

USB 2.0, and it's slow.

 

Body

Magnesium. Similar to the 20D, it lacks the seals of the 1D series.

 

Power

BP-511A included (also works with BP-514, BP-511 and BP-512). Rated 800 shots (CIPA). Battery weighs 2.9 ounces (82g). A CR2016 lithium coin cell keeps the clock running, even with no main battery. This backup battery is held in with a screw below the digital connectors on the side.

CG-580 charger, which is a compact folding-plug (no cord) version. The blinking light tells you 0%, 50%, 75% and 100% charge.

 

Size

6.0 x 4.4 x 3.0 inches (152 x 113 x 75 mm).

 

Weight

31.890 oz. (904.05g), measured with batery and card.

Canon specifies (28.6 ounces (810 g), stripped without battery or card. The Nikon D200 is about the same; 830g empty.

 

Made in

Japan.

 

Optional

Wireless File Transmitter WFT-E1.

BG-E4 battery grip in matching magnesium. It holds two BP-511A/514/512/511 battery packs or six AA batteries. It has a shutter release, AE/FE lock button, AF point selector and main dial for vertical shots.

Ee-D (Precision Matte with Grid) and (Ee-S) Super Precision Matte focus screens. The standard screen is the Ee-A Standard Precision Matte screen.

Data Verification Kit DVK-E2 v2.2 to verify the authenticity of images. It verifies image files are as they left the cameras and have not been altered. This is for police departments and private investigators, not artists.

 

Announced

22 August 2005.

 

Available Since

October, 2005

 

Rendered Obsolete

By the 5D Mark II, announced 17 September 2008.

 

Price

About $400 used in December 2015.

About $1,500 used in April 2010.

About $1,900 after instant rebate in June 2008.

In Fall 2007 there were no rebates, so it ran $2,500.

In Fall 2006 it was about $2,100 after mail-in rebates.

At introduction in October 2005 it sold for $3,299.

 

Performance   back to top

Introduction    Specifications    Performance    Compared    Recommendations

Be sure to read the Specifications and Introduction sections above where I address many other performance details.

 

Image Quality

As I've covered above, Image quality is the very best I've ever owned in a DLSR. I've never been able to afford a 1Ds.

The only invisible oddity is low chroma bandwidth in the JPGs. This means if you have a single-pixel red pip of a flower on a green background, that the redness (but not sharpness) is smeared a bit. Weird, but true. This has never affected a real picture, but you'll see it if you look for it at 100% with other deliberate test images (Try a wide shot of a magenta bougainvillea).

I was astounded when I discovered that a cheap $175 Russian fisheye on my 5D gave better image quality than my brand-new 10.5mm Nikkor on my D200. See the comparison in my Zenitar 16mm Fisheye review.

This is part of The Full Frame Advantage, part of which which is that even bad lenses can look better on full frame than great lenses on a smaller format. Of course if I use a good lens, my 15mm Canon fisheye on the 5D is the best fisheye system I've ever used, and works spectacularly well for stretching back out in DxO software.

 

Example Images

Here are 6MB JPGs direct from my 5D:  Yosemite Valley ©     Green Wall ©    Trees ©    Gazebo ©.

Look at them in Photoshop and go print them for yourself. The first is with thee 16-35 L II, the middle two are with my inexpensive 17-40mm L, the last and sharpest one is with the extraordinarily sharp 100mm Macro.

This is crazy, I've never seen anything as good as this out of my Nikon D200 in terms of definition. These files are the most compressed (normal, or stairstep icon) Large JPG direct from my 5D, no raw, no Photoshop, no nothing.

These were some of the first images I mage with my 5D in 2006. Since each of these 6MB JPGs take as much room as 100 of my other web pages, I'd like to, but won't post any better, newer ones since they are such data hogs as the internet goes. I posted in the course of other reviews, and these shots give you the idea.

Here are example galleries: Eastern Sierra   Death Valley    Rt 66.

 

Color

Colors are great.

Saturation, at +2, is about the same as my D200 and earlier era Nikons at their maximums. The 5D goes to +4. +3 or +4 is all I want for the images you've seen at examples. The D300 and D3 let me crank colors father, but +3 or +4 on the 5D is all I want.

The Rebel XT, 20D and my older Nikons all go to +2 saturation when pushed, while the 30D, Rebel XTi and this 5D go to +4.

 

Battery Life

Battery Life is excellent.

I got 1,200 shots on my first charge before I got the 30% left indication (partial icon). I got another 200 shots, to 1,400, when I got the 7% indication (blinking icon). At 1,500 shots it died.

On my second, third and fourth charges I got 800 shots at the 30% icon (the steady, partial cell).

It's got a great charger, too: it has a folding plug with a clever blinking light that tells the charge percentage.

An indicated full charge from a battery discharged to the steady partial battery icon (30% charge) recharges in only about an hour. A subsequent charge got me 900 shots at the 30% mark.

The manual says that the 100% indication (a steady light) is really only a 90% charge, and to let it sit for a few more hours if you want 100%. I don't worry, it's hard to run down a 5D battery in a day.

 

Exposure

I usually need to set -2/3 compensation outdoors, and 0 in flat light indoors. It's not as good as my D200.

 

High ISO

The Canon 5D excels at high ISOs. Not only is it clean, but more importantly, its sharper since the 5D doesn't need to apply as much sharpness and texture-robbing noise reduction.

See comparisons and examples to other cameras at High ISO Comparisons.

 

Ergonomics

Unlike my Nikons, the 5D isn't comfortable to hold. The buttons, especially the depth-of-field preview, is on the wrong side, so I need a second hand to use it.

I have to hit the play button and wait a moment to be able to zoom an image I just shot, or to select other images. Nikons don't need this; they allow instant zoom or browsing after a shot. I'm not kidding; this really bugs me.

After the 5D goes to sleep after you last looked at an image, playback wakes up at the most recent shot, which is not necessarily where you wanted to see. I prefer other cameras that return to the last viewed image, unless of course you make a new shot or turn off the camera, for which every camera shows the most recent shot.

Like many electronic products, the 5D doesn't respond as quickly to my inputs as I'd like. I have little tolerance for delay. On playback, spinning the knob to select among images can start working like a rubber band: spin the knob and it take a while for the 5D to catch up. I prefer my Nikons, even my D40, for this.

Shutter release is great, there's no delay. The delays are in navigating playback and menus.

There's no ability to set the 5D in full stops.

My 5D has a relatively slippery plastic covering, not the much better rubbery covering of the Nikon D200.

The strap attaches to slots, not to posts via split rings. I prefer this over my D200.

 

Viewfinder

The finder is huge, just like film cameras.

The eye relief (eyepoint) isn't as good as pro cameras. The viewfinder window is more of a peephole than a porthole.

The numeric display at the bottom is often hard to read because the numbers are very thin and dim. Like almost all modern cameras, the numbers adjust their brightness automatically to conditions.

The screen is very good. The AF zones are marked, but don't clutter the viewfinder as they do in my Nikons.

 

Sound

I kid you not; when I first got my 5D I laughed when I finally recognized the sound of the 5D firing. Unlike smaller format DSLRs, the 5D is slower and has a bigger mirror. It reminds me of an old Graflex!

 

Program Shift

Program Shift means you can spin a dial to select alternate sets of apertures and shutter speeds in Program.

As I recall, Program Shift doesn't work with flash, which is stupid. Nikons do this.

The 5D is really a 30D with a bigger sensor, and the 30D is designed more for snapshooters than for pros. Therefore, the Program Shift cancels every time the meter turns itself off. When I use program shift I usually use it when I'm using ultrawide lenses and want smaller apertures, so I prefer Program Shift to work like my Nikons and stay shifted until I change modes or turn off the camera's power switch.

 

Auto ISO

No AUTO ISO, except in the green dummy mode, which then only goes from 100 - 400. This is a huge flaw - I live by AUTO ISO in my Nikons.

This is my biggest complaint about my 5D, along with the crummy LCD.

 

Bracketing

Bracketing should be done in Continuous shutter mode, in which case you just hold down the shutter until it stops shooting the sequence automatically. If you're in Single shot drive mode you have to press three times. Set the self timer and the 5D always makes the three bracket shots.

 

Long Bulb Exposures

The top LCD counts up in seconds, from 1 to 999, while the shutter is open. Every camera should do this! I wish it were smart enough to light the display automatically.

Use an RS-80N3 (a button on a 2.6' (80cm) cord for $50), or the TC-80N3, which is the same thing, but with a timer and LCD clock display for $135.

Sorry, there's no normal cable release for a $2 conventional cable release, and no integral infrared remote like the Nikon D40.

 

Mirror Lock Up

There is no hard mirror lockup, nor does any other digital camera of which I know have one.

To get a mirror pre-release for reducing camera shake, set MENU > Custom Functions (C.Fn) >12 Mirror lockup > 1: enable. Then set the self timer by pressing the DRIVE - ISO button and spinning the top front command dial. (It's difficult to do this with one hand.)

Now the self timer resets to 2 seconds. Tap the shutter, the mirror flips up, the timer counts down on the top LCD, and the 5D makes the exposure.

When done, you need to remember to reset both the custom function and the self timer. If you forget, weird things happen.

If you use one of those $100 electronic releases, set the custom function but not the self timer. Now the first press of the release flips the mirror, and the second releases the shutter. You can do the same thing with the camera's shutter release button if you don't have a $100 remote cord, but since the second press also would be on the camera, that would defeat the purpose.

Smarter photographers who often use this mode save it as a camera preset, the C position on the mode dial, explained next.

 

"C" Settings on Mode Dial

This is great: you can set the 5D as you like it, and save those settings to the "C" position on the mode dial, right past "M."

Of course it would be much better if Canon was bright enough to provide several of these (C1, C2, C3, etc.) for the other positions on the dial, but oh well, Nikon provides none of these.

To save the camera's settings to the "C" position, use the "Register Camera Settings" option in the menus.

 

Cold Weather

At 35 F (0C), it works the same as it does at 70F (20C) for at least a few hours.

At 10 F (-10C), it works fine, but I've not had it out for more than 30 minutes at that temperature.

 

Data

JPG Efficiency

JPGs are much more efficient than the JPGs from Nikons. The 5D, like most Canons, optimizes file size automatically depending on the subject. For instance, a shot of a blank sky might be a 500kB JPG, while a shot of a forest showing with every single leaf might be 6MB.

I shoot not in the default FINE JPG (the quarter circle and L), but prefer the great looking, smaller file size NORMAL JPG (The Stair-step and L).

Data Transfer Speed

Downloading from the 5D's USB port is slow and requires software. I prefer to pull out my SanDisk Extreme IV card and suck it out instantly with SanDisk's special reader.

53 seconds to transfer 117 MB (54 files) with Lexar 40x.2 minutes to transfer 267MB (114 files) with 2GB SanDisk Extreme III

2-1/4 minutes to transfer 222 MB (245 files)

7-1/4 minutes to transfer 800 MB (400 shots) from a 2GB SanDisk Extreme III

That's too darn long. Shot on and read with the Extreme IV cards and reader, 800 MB should transfer in 34 seconds, not seven minutes. The 53 seconds required to download 117MB should only taker 5 seconds.

These speed limits are caused by the camera, not the cards.

EXIF Data

White balance from different cameras doesn't always read correctly in iView.

My 5D reads as follows:

Camera set to

EXIF reads (in iView)

AUTO

AUTO

Daylight

Daylight

Shade

AUTO

Cloudy

D65

Tungsten

Tungsten

Fluorescent

Fluorescent

Custom (Gray card)

Preset

Kelvin

AUTO

Long bulb exposures read correctly. A 139 second exposure reads 139 seconds.

 

Construction

It feels as I'd expect from good amateur or part-time pro camera.

Top Cover: Magnesium Alloy

Back: Plastic

Control Knobs: Plastic. The top left knob feels dinky, the other two are swell.

CF Card Door: Plastic (metal hinge).

Made in: Japan.

 

Compared   top

Introduction    Specifications    Performance    Compared    Recommendations

NEW: High-ISO Comparisons of the Nikon D1, D3 (D700), D4, D800, D7000 and Canon 5D, 5D Mark II, 5D Mark III and Fuji X-Pro1 and X100 06 April 2012

INEW: 2012 DSLR Comparison 18 April 2012

 

Recommendations   top

Introduction    Specifications    Performance    Compared    Recommendations

Want the best landscape and fine art digital camera on the planet for under $8,000? Get this 5D for $1,900 while you can. Sure, I'll bet a Canon 5D Mk II is annonced around the end of August 2008, but you can't shoot with that today, and I'l bet you a Mk II will cost $2,700.

You people know who you are. If you want the very best possible image quality in any digital camera costing less than $8,000, go get a 5D today.

If you shoot from a tripod, get a 5D. If you shoot landscapes digitally while backpacking, get the 5D regardless of your budget, since the 5D is the lightest full-frame digital camera.

 

© Ken Rockwell. All rights reserved. Tous droits réservés. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

 

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Ken

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EOS 6D

EOS DIGITAL CAMERA LIMITED WARRANTYFor The U.S.A. And Canada Only

The limited warranty set forth below is given by Canon U.S.A., Inc. (Canon U.S.A.) in the United States or Canon Canada Inc., (Canon Canada) in Canada with respect to the Canon brand EOS Digital Camera (the “Product”) *, when purchased and used in the United States or Canada. The Product purchased with this limited warranty is the only EOS Digital Camera to which this limited warranty applies.

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  2. Use of parts or supplies (other than those sold by Canon U.S.A. or Canon Canada) that cause damage to the Product or cause abnormally frequent service calls or service problems 
  3. If the Product has had its serial number or dating altered or removed.

NO IMPLIED WARRANTY, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, APPLIES TO THE PRODUCT AFTER THE APPLICABLE PERIOD OF THE EXPRESS LIMITED WARRANTY STATED ABOVE, AND NO OTHER EXPRESS WARRANTY OR GUARANTY, EXCEPT AS MENTIONED ABOVE, GIVEN BY ANY PERSON OR ENTITY WITH RESPECT TO THE PRODUCT SHALL BIND CANON U.S.A. OR CANON CANADA (SOME STATES AND PROVINCES DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG AN IMPLIED WARRANTY LASTS, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU)..NEITHER CANON U.S.A. NOR CANON CANADA SHALL BE LIABLE FOR LOSS OF REVENUES OR PROFITS, INCONVENIENCE, EXPENSE FOR SUBSTITUTE EQUIPMENT OR SERVICE, STORAGE CHARGES, LOSS OR CORRUPTION OF DATA, OR ANY OTHER SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES CAUSED BY THE USE OR MISUSE OF, OR INABILITY TO USE, THE EOS DIGITAL CAMERA, REGARDLESS OF THE LEGAL THEORY ON WHICH THE CLAIM IS BASED, AND EVEN IF CANON U.S.A. OR CANON CANADA HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. IN NO EVENT SHALL RECOVERY OF ANY KIND AGAINST CANON USA OR CANON CANADA BE GREATER IN AMOUNT THAN THE PURCHASE PRICE OF THE PRODUCT SOLD BY CANON USA OR CANON CANADA AND CAUSING THE ALLEGED DAMAGE. WITHOUT LIMITING THE FOREGOING, YOU ASSUME ALL RISK AND LIABILITY FOR LOSS, DAMAGE OR INJURY TO YOU AND YOUR PROPERTY AND TO OTHERS AND THEIR PROPERTY ARISING OUT OF USE OR MISUSE OF, OR INABILITY TO USE, THE PRODUCT NOT CAUSED DIRECTLY BY THE NEGLIGENCE OF CANON USA OR CANON CANADA (SOME STATES AND PROVINCES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU). THIS LIMITED WARRANTY SHALL NOT EXTEND TO ANYONE OTHER THAN THE ORIGINAL PURCHASER OF THE PRODUCT, OR THE PERSON FOR WHOM IT WAS PURCHASED AS A GIFT, AND STATES YOUR EXCLUSIVE REMEDY.

Canon U.S.A.You may obtain technical support** for your Product as follows:E-mail support via our Web site at www.canontechsupport.comTelephone assistance from a Canon U.S.A. Customer Care representative free of charge during regular business hours at 1-800-OK-CANON (1-800-652-2666)

Canon CanadaYou may obtain technical support* for your Product as follows:Telephone assistance from a Canon Canada Customer Care representative free of charge during regular business hours at 1-800-OK-CANON (1-800-652-2666)When you call, have your Product serial number and your date of purchase available to expedite service. A Canon Customer Care representative will attempt to diagnose the nature of the problem and correct it over the telephone. If the problem cannot be corrected over the telephone, you will be asked to follow the applicable procedures for MAIL-IN SERVICE. Note that a dated proof of purchase is required at the time of service. This requirement will be satisfied by providing a copy of your dated bill of sale.

** Technical support program specifics subject to change without notice.

MAIL-IN SERVICE is a program under which your Product is repaired by a Canon U.S.A. or a Canon Canada authorized service center for the Product. Authorized service center information can be obtained by visiting www.canontechsupport.com (US customers only) or by contacting the Canon U.S.A., Customer Care Center or Canon Canada Customer Information Centre at 1-800-OK-CANON (1-800-652-2666). You will be given the name, address and phone number of an authorized service center.

It is your responsibility to properly package and send the defective Product, together with a copy of your dated proof of purchase, a complete explanation of the problem and a return address to the authorized service center at your expense. Do not include any other items with the defective Product. The Product covered by this limited warranty and proven to be defective upon inspection will be repaired and returned to you without charge by the authorized service center. Any Product received by the authorized service center that is not covered by the limited warranty will be returned unrepaired, or at the discretion of the authorized service provider, you may receive a written estimate of repair at such cost as the service center may establish from time to time.

This limited warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights, which vary from state to state (or province to province in Canada).

*The battery pack packaged with the Product carries a separate ninety (90) day limited warranty.

www.usa.canon.com


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