Sony RX100 III vs RX100 II vs RX100 – Differences. Фотоаппарат sony rx100m2


Sony RX100 IV vs RX100 III vs RX100 II – Difference Comparison

 

In this article we’ll take a closer look at the differences between the new Sony RX100 IV and its predecessors, the RX100 III and RX100 II. We’ll start with a short introduction about the RX100 IV and move on to the comparison section.

Sony RX100 IV

The first RX100 camera was introduces in June 6, 2012. The RX100 series is a very popular one. In fact, Sony RX100 are probably among the best compact cameras you can buy on the market right now. The new RX100 IV offers some incremental changes from the RX100 III and is a host of some of Sony’s latest innovative technologies.

On the outside, the RX100 IV looks almost completely identical to its predecessor. The main differences lies underneath.  The Sony Cyber-shot RX100 IV utilizes a 20.1MP 1.0-type stacked CMOS sensor, and it’s the first stacked CMOS sensor that uses a memory-attached DRAM chip.

What is a Stacked Sensor? – well, unlike a conventional CMOS sensor where the photodiodes (light sensitive pixels) and the circuits sits on the same silicon substrate, in a Stacked Sensor, the two resides in different stacks. Compared to a traditional BSI sensor, Sony Exmor RS Stacked Sensor offers some advantages, including better fill factor because of better layer separation and on-board memory (solves some bandwidth related issues). The Sony Stacked Sensor therefore brings some significant performance boost compared to previous sensors. For example, the RX100 IV can capture 4K videos using XAVC S codec, can shoot at 16 fps in burst mode, can capture stills at 1/32,000 sec due to very first readouts and 40x super slow motion videos at up to 960 fps.

1/32000 sec can be useful in reducing rolling shutter effect in videos and allow more control over exposure. This mean that that you can still get well-exposed shot with fast-apertures when shooting under very bright lighting conditions.  So you’ll still get to maintain that beautiful shallow depth of field, instead of closing the aperture in order to reduce the amount of light.

We still get to have the same amazing Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* 24-70mm (equiv.) f/1.8-f/2.8 lens. The Electronic viewfinder got a resolution boost from 1.44M dots to 2.36M dots. The rear tilting LCD is the same as before, no touchscreen though for those who hoped for this feature.

Here’s a $K video clip captured with the RX100 IV. In order to appreciate the resolution, you’ll need to watch it on a 4K display. By the way, the 4K video recording on the RX100 IV is limited for 5 minutes.

We’ll get into more in-depth detail soon, but as you can see, it isn’t a huge difference. Sony did want to make the RX100 IV among the first to utilize the new Stacked Sensor and enjoy its benefits. I like the EVF resolution increment, fast burst speed, the 4K video offering and super-fast shutter speed. I have to admit that in some ways I would have expected a bit more, maybe an update to the lens and maybe some changes in the camera design. That said, we can’t deny the fact that there isn’t any compact camera on the market that offers what the RX100 IV has to offer.

 RX100 IV vs RX100 III vs RX100 II

Let’s take a closer look at the differences between those three cameras.

RX100 IV (M4)RX100 III (M3)RX100 II (M2)
AnnouncedJune 10, 2015May 16, 2014June 27, 2013
Build Qualityaluminumaluminum aluminum
Sensor20.1 megapixels 1.0-type (13.2 x 8.8 mm) Exmor RS CMOS (Stacked) 3:2 aspect ratio20.1 megapixels 1.0-type (13.2mm x 8.8 mm) Exmor R CMOS (BSI) 3:2 aspect ratio20.2 megapixels 1.0-type (13.2mm x 8.8 mm) Exmor R CMOS (BSI) 3:2 aspect ratio
Image ProcessorBionz XBionz XBionz
ISO125-12800 Expandable to ISO 80/100 / ISO 25600125-12800 Expandable to ISO 80/100 / ISO 25600

(up to 12800 in movies)

160-12800 Expandable to ISO 100 / ISO 25600
RAWYesYesYes
LensZeiss Vario-Sonnar T* Lens 24-70mm F1.8-2.8 (equiv.)

10 elements in 9 groups

9 aspherical glass elements, 2 advanced aspherical (AA) elements (cemented together, * world's first)

7 circular diaphragm blades

2.9x optical zoom

5cm macro focus range 30cm normal focus range

Optical SteadyShot image stabilization (5-axis in movie recording / active)

Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* Lens 24-70mm F1.8-2.8 (equiv.)

10 elements in 9 groups

9 aspherical glass elements, 2 advanced aspherical (AA) elements (cemented together, * world's first)

7 circular diaphragm blades

2.9x optical zoom

5cm macro focus range 30cm normal focus range

Optical SteadyShot image stabilization (5-axis in movie recording / active)

ZEISS Vario-Sonnar T* Lens 28-100mm F1.8-4.9 (equiv.)

7 elements in 6 groups

4 aspherical elements, 1 advanced aspherical (AA) element

7 circular diaphragm blades

3.6x optical zoom

5cm macro focus range 50cm normal focus range

Optical SteadyShot image stabilization (3-axis)

Built-in ND FilterYes 1/8 (3 stops)Yes 1/8 (3 stops)No
LCD3-inch 1228.8K-dots

Tilting (up approx. 180 deg., down approx. 45 deg.)Great for selfies

WhiteMagic TFT-LCD

Not touchscreen

3-inch 1228.8K-dots

Tilting (up approx. 180 deg., down approx. 45 deg.)Great for selfies

WhiteMagic TFT-LCD

Not touchscreen

3-inch 1228.8K-dots

Tilting (up approx. 84 deg., down approx. 45 deg.)

WhiteMagic TFT-LCD

Not touchscreen

ViewfinderBuild-in EVF

2359K-dots

OLED type 100% coverage 0.59x magnification

ZEISS® T* coating enhanced clarity

Eye-sensor

Build-in EVF

1440K-dots

OLED type 100% coverage 0.59x magnification

ZEISS® T* coating enhanced clarity

Eye-sensor

Optional
Shutter Speed40-1/32000 sec30-1/2000 sec30-1/2000 sec
Pop-up FlashYesYesYes
External FlashNoNoYes (via Multi Interface shoe)
Burst16 fps

(Speed Priority)

10 fps

(Speed Priority)

10 fps

(Speed Priority)

Exposure Bracketing±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±3±3±3
WB BrackeringYesYesNo
Video2160p30 2160p24 1080p60 1080i60 1080p24

720p60 720p30 720p24 720p120

High frame-rate (HFR) 1080p240 1080p480 1080p960

5-axis image stabilization

MPEG-4, AVCHD, XAVC S

* Supports XAVC S / 50Mbps bit rage. SDXC card with Class 10 or higher is required for XAVC S recording

Clear HDMI output (Preview)

1080p60 1080i60 1080p24

720p60/30/24/120

Stereo sound

5-axis image stabilization (first in the series) and Sony's frame analysis technology

MPEG-4, AVCHD, XAVC S

* Supports XAVC S / 50Mbps bit rage. SDXC card with Class 10 or higher is required for XAVC S recording

Clear HDMI output (Preview)

1080p60 1080i60

Stereo sound

MPEG-4, AVCHD

Clear HDMI output (Preview)

Microphone Port/ Headphone JackNo / NoNo / NoNo / No
WirelessWi-Fi / NFCWi-Fi / NFCWi-Fi / NFC
AF Points25 contrast-detect AF points

Fast Intelligent AF

25 contrast-detect AF points25 contrast-detect AF points
Eye AFYesYesNo
PlayMemories SupportYesYesYes
Battery Life280 shots (CIPA)320 shots (CIPA)350 shots (CIPA)
Weight298 g (0.66 lb / 10.51 oz)290 g (0.64 lb / 10.23 oz)281 g (0.62 lb / 9.91 oz)
Dimensions102 x 58 x 41 mm (4.02 x 2.28 x 1.61″)102 x 58 x 41 mm (4.02 x 2.28 x 1.61″)102 x 58 x 38 mm (4 x 2.29 x 1.51″)

As you can see from the above RX100 IV vs RX100 III vs RX100 II comparison table, the RX100 IV has several benefits over its predecessor. Sony also improved the AF system in the new version. According to Sony official site, the new autofocus system is an improved version over the A7 series and incorporated predicted AF range and accelerating lens drive to further enhance AF locking speed. Unfortunately, Sony didn’t add a touchscreen, the lens is still the same as in the RX100 III, there is no option to connect and external flash.

That being said, we can’t deny that there isn’t any other camera on the market that offers such a huge arsenal of advances features in such a small compact body. It is in no doubt, one of the best, if not THE best compact camera on the market today. It’s super versatile and offers a wide range of advanced technologies that will help you capture beautiful moments without limiting your creativity.

The Sony RX100 II is still a very good choice for those who search for a great compact camera for a lesser price. It costs around $400 less than the new RX100 IV and you get a slower and less wider lens (although with slightly more reach), an older sensor, the LCD cannot be tilted 180 degrees as in the M4, there is no built-in EVF (optional buy, can be attached via the accessory shoe), it has lower max shutter speed and burst, limited video functionality with no XAVC S codec offering and it uses an older generation Bionz processor.

I personally think that the RX100 IV or RX100 III are well worth the extra price over the RX100 II. For $100 more you can buy the RX100 III, which is already a significant step forward. Between the RX100 IV and the RX100 III, it depends whether you are convinced with the new feature and intend to use them.

Conclusion

If you are searching for the perfect compact camera, the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 IV is as close as you can get.  A camera that you can carry everywhere you go. You can count on it to capture brilliant stills and videos every time and not limit your creativity when you need it the most. It’s the perfect family camera that every family member can use. It’s small and elegant, yet boasts some of the best of what the imaging industry has to offer. It’s amazing in low-light as it’s in daylight and all in all, it’s very hard to resist, every when comparing it to interchangeable-lens cameras. If you are searching for an ILC alternative in a compact body, this would be it – Highly recommended!

You can order the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV camera from B&H Photo here.

Related posts:

  1. Sony RX100 Overheating Problem – Proof?
  2. Sony RX100 III Camera Questions & Answers – Unofficial
  3. Sony RX100 III vs RX100 II vs RX100 – Differences
  4. Sony RX100 III vs Canon G1 X Mark II vs Canon S120
  5. Sony RX100 or DSLR
  6. Sony Cyber-shot RX100 II (RX100M2) vs RX100 – Features and Image Quality Comparison
  7. Why Should You Buy Sony RX100?
  8. Canon Rebel T4i / 650D vs Sony NEX-5R vs RX100 – Comparison Review
  9. Canon PowerShot S110 vs Sony RX100 Comparison

www.cameradebate.com

Sony DSC-RX100M2 Dijital Fotoğraf Makinesi Fiyatı Özellikleri

Sony

Ürünün ne zaman stoğa gireceğini öğrenmek için Canlı Destek'ten bilgi alabilir ve ön sipariş verebilirsiniz.

Canon PowerShot G9X Dijital Fotoğraf Makinesi

Fiyat: 2249,00 TL

Ürünü İncele

Kit Seçenekleri

Birlikte Satın Alabileceğiniz Ürünler

Sony DSC-RX100M2 Dijital Fotoğraf Makinesi İnceleme

 

Sony RX100 M2 Dijital Fotoğraf Makinesi Detaylı İncelemesi ve Teknik Özellikleri

 

Sony RX100 M2 ISO Aralığı ve Performansı

     Geniş 125–6400 ISO aralığı sayesinde gün doğumundan günbatımına kadar net, doğal sonuçlar elde edebilirsiniz. En iyi ayarı belirleme işini Otomatik ISO moduna bırakabilir ya da ISO seviyesini kendiniz ayarlayabilirsiniz. ISO 6400'e kadar yüksek ISO ayarlarında çekim yapın. Gece sahnelerinde zengin ayrıntılar yakalayın.

 

Sony RX100 M2' nin Cmos Sensör ve İşlemcisi

         1,0 tipi sensör, çoğu kompakt fotoğraf makinesi sensöründen yaklaşık 4 kat daha büyüktür. Geniş diyafram açıklığına sahip F1,8 ZEISS Vario-Sonnar® T* lens ile 20,2MP Exmor® CMOS sensör ışığı etkili şekilde yakalar ve güçlü BIONZ işlemci yumuşak ayrıntı ve olağanüstü düşük gürültü üretir.

         Sony RX100 M2' nin Küçük Kompakt Yapısını Keşfedin

      DSC-RX100 M2, uzman özelliklere sahip olan ve hafif alüminyumdan zarif, kompakt tasarımıyla cebinize sığacak kadar küçük olan bir üründür. Küçük boyuna rağmen çok kaliteli fotoğraflar çekmenize olanak tanır

      

Sony RX100 M2' nin LCD Ekranı

  7,5 cm LCD ekran, yüksek kontrast için WhiteMagic™ teknolojisini kullanır. Yüksek çözünürlüklü LCD ekran sayesinde çektiğiniz fotoğrafları anında yüksek kalite altında görüntüleyebilme imkanına sahip olacaksınız

Kutu İçeriği

  • • Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 II Dijital Fotoğraf Makinesi
  • • NP-BX1 şarj edilebilir Lityum-İyon Pil Paketi (3.6V, 1240mAh)
  • • AC Adaptör AC-UB10
  • • Mikro USB Kablosu
  • • Bilek Kayışı
  • • Omuz Askı Adaptörü
  • • Garanti

Taksit Seçenekleri

Tek Çekim : 1999 TL

Stokta Yok

Ücretsiz Kargo

Fiyat : 2499 TL

Kazancınız : 500 TL

İndirimli Fiyat : 1999 TL

0.01TL para puan kazanacaksınız.

Mağazamıza gelip elden teslim alın.

İstanbul İçi VIP Kurye Teslimat Seçeneği

fotografium.com

Sony RX100 III vs RX100 II vs RX100

In this article I will give you an in-depth introduction of the new Sony Cyber-shot RX100 III pocket large-sensor zoom camera.  We’ll talk about its key features and the reasons why this little camera should be your next camera. Furthermore, I will compare the RX100 III versus the two older model, the RX100 II and the RX100 (Mark I). There significant chanced in the new model, so without further ado, let’s get excited!

Sony RX100 III

The Cyber-shot RX100 III, or some refer to it as the RX100 Mark 3 or MK3 in short, was announced in May 16, 2014.  There was a great anticipation for a replacement for the RX100 II, which in many people’s opinion, was one of the most interesting, innovative and best performing compact camera on the market.

On of the main reasons why the Rx100 series a lot of attention was due to the combination of advanced photographic capabilities and high performance, all packed in a pocket-sized camera — a camera that you can take everywhere you go. For many photographers this all that it needs to be convinced to get this camera, and the RX100 and RX100 II releases, followed by mane positive reviews from the leading camera review websites.

Sony is already a synonym to innovation in the photography world, but not just. Sony keep innovating and that make more people make a transition and buy its products.  I am among those by the way.

The Sony RX100 III is the latest in the RX line of premium compact cameras.  The new camera has many of its predecessor features improved and some new added as well. The RX100 III does feature the same exact 1″ (13.2×8.8mm) BSI 201.MP sensor as its predecessor, the RX100II, but enjoys a more advanced Bionz X image processor.

1-inch sensor vs 1/2.3-inch sensor size comparison - light capture area that is 4 times greater than the 1/2.3" sensor

The RX100 III 1″ sensor is also referred to as large-sensor, because it’s much larger than the conventional 1/2.3″ (6.17×4.55mm) size sensor that you can find on many compact camera and bridge cameras.

Sony also improved the lens by using a specially developed Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* 24-70mm f/1.8-2.8 lens.  So the RX100 II features both a wider-angle (thank you Sony!) compared to the 28mm of the previous models, but it’s also faster (f/2.8 vs f/4.9) as the tele-end. The catch here, and there is a slight catch if you haven’t noticed, is that Sony decided to use a lens with a shorter focal length range, or smaller zoom in other words. So instead of a 3.6x optical zoom lens, you get a 2.9x optical zoom. 24-70mm focal length is a very popular range for a walkaround/general purpose lens.  I don’t know how many people will miss the 70-100mm range, but I assume that Sony had no other option in order to keep the lens size small, and the price relatively low. Furthermore, I think that having a faster is better, because it elevates the camera’s low-light capabilities and therefore allows you to shoot at night and get well-exposed shots, without the need to have an external flash or without the nee to bump up the ISO to very high sensitivity — which can lead to more image noise.

The new lens gives 1 stop advantage over the RX100 and RX100 II lenses, which means that it can gather twice the amount of light at the tele-end. This also means that you have more control of the depth of field, and you can achieve more prominent background defocus effect. On top of this, you will be able to capture fast moving subjects with better ease, because you can use a faster shutter speed /  aperture combination without the need to use higher ISO sensitivity. I personally prefer faster apertures due to the more prominent shallow depth of field effect, which allows me to be more creative with my shots.

Having a 24mm lens (compared to 28mm) allows more of the scene to be captured from a given same distance from the subject compared to a 28mm lens.  It’s great for landscape shots, group shots and macro as well (as close as 30 cm).  This is also what made the RX100 a popular camera among travelers. Indeed, it’s lack the zoom range as some other superzoom lenses, but you gain better portability, wide-angle and better low-light capabilities which are, so it seems, not less important then having a big zoom.

The new lens feature 10 elements in 9 groups, including nine aspherical glass elements alongside two advanced aspherical elements, which both have lute together to provide edge-to-edge clarity and sharpness, while also helping to maintain the compactness of the optics. According to Sony, this is the first time such lens elements molding is used. The Sony Cyber-shot RX100 III lens also features ZEISS T* unique lens coating that further enhance reduec flare and ghosting.  Sony works hard to perfect the lens and make its new baby appeal to enthusiasts and pros who are looking for a super advanced compact camera. The lens is one of the most important parts of this camera, and no doubt that Sony put a lot of effort to perfect it to a great extent.  The lens features seven-blade circular aperture for buttery-smooth defocus effect (aka Bokeh).

Sony also incorporated a 3-stop neutral density filter, that allows you to have more flexibility when shooting outdoors at bright daylight, and you want to use slower shutter speeds, while still maintaining an optimal exposure or still maintaining the shallow depth of field with the aperture wide open.

I think that even without talking about the other features, the new lens by itself might might already convinced RX100 and RX100 II owners to upgrade to the new model, and such an amazing model it is.

BUT wait, it’s far away from being over.

RX100 III also features a pop-up electronic viewfinder, alongside its pop-up flash

The Sony Cyber-shot RX100 MK3 also features a (new to the series) 1.4M-dot OLED Tru-Finder EVF with ZEISS T* coating on the eyepiece to reduce reflections. This is not just the ordinary EVF that you can expect in a premium compact camera. The EVF itself is built inside the camera itself with a pop-up mechanism – That’s what I call innovation! More than that, the RX100 III costs approx. $100 more than the RX100 II at the time of writing. This means that you don’t need to buy an external EVF that costs around $250-$350 (depends on the model, maybe more or less, didn’t do a comprehensive check) and takes a lot of space at the top of the camera – AMAZING!

By using this type of pop-up mechanism, Sony kept the RX100 III size smaller. This instead of using it externally, which would lead to a large bulge at the top.

At the back of the camera you’ll find a  tiltable LCD display, which was designed to allow easy selfie shooting (self-portraits) by tilting the display 180-degrees up, or 45 degrees down for for high-angle shots.

Sony RX100 III selfie shooting using the rotating LCD

The Sony Cyber-shot RX100 III, like its predecessors, can shoot Full HD videos. However, the RX1000 III enjoys more advanced features, including the option to record videos using the XAVC S format. The XAVC S is Sony’s own format. It was announced by Sony on April 7, 2013. This format supports video recording up to 3840×2160 resolution (3840×2160 = 8,294,400 pixels = UHD-1 Ultra High Definition Television resolution) and uses MP4 as its container format and AAC or LPCM for the audio recording.

The RX100 III is the first of the RX series to use this format. It allows the camera to capture videos at 50 mbps using a lower compression. This leads to improved video quality that many enthusiast videographers demand. Just keep in mind that you’ll need to purchase a fast SDXC card with a Class 10 or higher (visit Sony website for more detailed information), as video recording at 50mbps cannot be recorded on a standard speed SD card. The RX100 III also supports Clear HDMI output (uncompressed video preview, however not for recording to external device), 120 fps 720p video recording, 5-axis image stabilization for video that Sony calls ‘Intelligent Active Mode’ (first in the series). This significantly helps to reduce the shakiness effect when shooting videos handheld.

Other features include a built-in Wi-Fi and NFC, PlayMemories app compatibility, P/A/S/M shooting modes, built-in sweep panorama function, auto HDR, Smile shutter technology, 10 fps continuous shooting at full resolution, 1/2000 sec maximum shutter speed, lots of picture effects and scene modes to play with, built-in LED as an AF illuminator, 25 contrast-detect AF points, Clear Image Zoom, 320 CIPA battery life, etc.

No doubt that the new Sony Cybershot RX100 III is meant for greatness. I am personally so excited to see that Sony keep innovating and keep emphasizing in improving in areas that are expected to be improved, and not just that, adding its own unique tech innovation technologies as well. What more can you ask for?

If you are like me, you are probably super excited about this new release. In the next section we’ll take a closer look at the differences between the new RX100 3 and the older models, so you can clearly see and understand the differences.

RX100 III vs RX100 II vs RX100

Now that you are familiar with the Sony RX100 III M3 key features, let’s take a look at the differences between the M3, M2 and M models.

RX100 III (M3)RX100 II (M2)RX100 (M)
AnnouncedMay 16, 2014June 27, 2013June 6, 2012
Build Qualityaluminum aluminum aluminum
Sensor20.1 megapixels 1.0-type (13.2mm x 8.8 mm) Exmor R CMOS (BSI) 3:2 aspect ratio20.2 megapixels 1.0-type (13.2mm x 8.8 mm) Exmor R CMOS (BSI) 3:2 aspect ratio20.2 megapixels 1.0-type (13.2mm x 8.8 mm) Exmor CMOS (FSI) 3:2 aspect ratio
All three cameras feature about the same image resolution and all three have the same sensor size. The main difference is that the RX100 II M2 and M3 both use the same Back-illuminated sensor, whether the first generation RX100 features a front-illuminated sensor.

In a BSI sensor, the wiring is at the back of the sensor, rather than the front. This allows much greater freedom to engineer the photodioe (the light gathering pixels), allowing the sensor to gather more light which (around two times more) and significantly boosting the camera's low-light performance overall.

There are some disadvantages for BSI sensors, including increase crosstalk (nearby light gathering sensors can interfere each other), which can lead to bleeding that can have negative effect on the image quality in part of the image as some photos are being collected in the wrong pixels which leads to decreased in SNR, they are more sensitive to breakage, they cost more than their FSI counterparts. For a more in-depth comparison, check out this FSI vs BSI PDF document on aptina.com.

In my observation, the RX100 II results in better high ISO performance compared to the RX100 M1, around on stop advantage. The RX100 M3 improved image processor should give the RX100 M3 and edge over the RX100 M2. So know doubt that if you are after better high ISO performance, picking the RX100II or RX100III is the best way to go.

Image ProcessorBionz XBionz Bionz
The RX100 III features Sony's latest Bionz X image processor. The same sensor used on the RX10 and found in some Sony Alpha interchangeable lens cameras (ILCE-7, ILCE-7R, a5000, a6000, A77 M2).

The image processor plays a significant role in making image looks better overall and improves the camera's performance all together.

Ther new Bionz X image processing engine can reproduce texture and details in real-time, reduce diffraction effect, has the ability to restore clarity to points of light and enhance fine details, provided area-specific noise reduction (e.g. applying stronger NR for sky area, which is more prone to noise), support 16-bit image processing and 14-bit RAW output.

All in all, you enjoy the advanced technologies and updated algorithms that should give you the best of the best of Sony image processing for its digital cameras. So in this regard, the new RX100 III has a very clear edge.

ISO125-12800 Expandable to ISO 80/100 / ISO 25600

(up to 12800 in movies)

160-12800 Expandable to ISO 100 / ISO 25600125-6400 Expandable to ISO80/100 / 25600
RAWYesYesYes
LensZeiss Vario-Sonnar T* Lens 24-70mm F1.8-2.8 (equiv.)

10 elements in 9 groups

9 aspherical glass elements, 2 advanced aspherical (AA) elements (cemented together, * world's first)

7 circular diaphragm blades

2.9x optical zoom

5cm macro focus range 30cm normal focus range

Optical SteadyShot image stabilization (5-axis in movie recording / active)

ZEISS Vario-Sonnar T* Lens 28-100mm F1.8-4.9 (equiv.)

7 elements in 6 groups

4 aspherical elements, 1 advanced aspherical (AA) element

7 circular diaphragm blades

3.6x optical zoom

5cm macro focus range 50cm normal focus range

Optical SteadyShot image stabilization (3-axis)

ZEISS Vario-Sonnar T* Lens 28-100mm F1.8-4.9 (equiv.)

7 elements in 6 groups

4 aspherical elements, 1 advanced aspherical (AA) element

7 circular diaphragm blades

3.6x optical zoom

5cm macro focus range 50cm normal focus range

Optical SteadyShot image stabilization (3-axis)

One of the more welcoming and importance differences. The RX100 III (M3) lens has shorter focal length range (smaller optical zoom), but it gains wider field of view (24mm vs 28mm) which is significant for landscape, group shots or interiors. It sounds not that much, but there is a significant difference at the wide angle, and I'm sure you'll appreciate having 24mm on your next camera.

The lens is also much faster at the tele-end as well, promoting better low-light capabilities, and also has more advanced optical construction that should give it an advantage over the RX100 II in terms of the lens optical performance (yet to be seen though).

This is one reason why you should consider upgrading from your older RX100 camera. Some people might feel a bit disappointed to lose the 70-100mm range, but I think that it's a good compromise to make in favor of a more advanced and faster lens.

The RX100 III also gives you better macro range and normal focus range as well. Overall, great improvements that will help you be more creative with your camera and more suitable for more people's shooting styles.

Built-in ND FilterYes 1/8 (3 stops)NoNo
The built-in ND filter really helps when shooting outdoors and in bright daylight.

It allows you do be more creative with your shots, by giving you the option to play with the shutter speed and aperture combination, in order to achieve different image effects.

For example, you can use the widest aperture to maintain the shallow depth of field effect, in comparison to closing the aperture a bit in order to prevent overexposure.

You can use slower shutter speeds for shooting a river flows in order to achieve smoother flowing effect, instead of needing to increase the shutter speed in order to prevent an exposed image.

There are many photographers who are using external ND filters in order to achieve the same effect, but those needed to be carry and be tied with the camera. So having the ND filter built-in, makes it much easier and portable, so you'll actually will take advantage of it when shooting outdoors.

LCD3-inch 1228.8K-dots

Tilting (up approx. 180 deg., down approx. 45 deg.)Great for selfies

WhiteMagic TFT-LCD

Not touchscreen

3-inch 1228.8K-dots

Tilting (up approx. 84 deg., down approx. 45 deg.)

WhiteMagic TFT-LCD

Not touchscreen

3-inch 1228.8K-dots

Fixed

WhiteMagic TFT-LCD

Not touchscreen

In each generation (M1, M2, M3) we can see that Sony improves the LCD display.

In the M1 we had a fixed LCD, in the M2 we got a tilting display, and on the M3 the tilting mechanism has improved to allow 180 degree rotation to make it easier to shoot selfies (self-portraits).

ViewfinderBuild-in EVF

OLED type 100% coverage 0.59x magnification

ZEISS® T* coating enhanced clarity

Eye-sensor

OptionalN/A
Here we can see that Sony also vastly improved in each generation.

The Sony RX100 M1 and M3 lacks the multi-interface shoe, therefore you are unable to attach an external viewfinder or an external flash.

On the RX100 II Sony added the Multi Inteface shoe, allowing to attach external accessories, like an external/optional electronic viewfinder or an external flash.

With the RX100 III Sony omitted the MI shoe but goes even further, implementing an electronic viewfinder inside the camera with a pop-up mechanism, so it won't have a negative effect on the camera's compact size when carrying it around in the pocket.

This is also a high-quality viewfinder as well, and this will save you a lot of money if you intended to buy the RX100 II and buy an EVF separately. SUPERB offering by Sony, and I have no doubt that Sony really listens to its customers, and it want to make the RX100 III the best compact camera on the market, leaving the competition way behind :)

It's worth mentioning that the available external EVFs do offers some advantages over the built-in EVF on the M3, including adjustable viewing position and higher resolution among others.

However, looking it in practical standpoint, I think that most people prefer it built-in, as it is a compact camera, and should be as portable as it can be.

My main problem with the external EVFs and why I absolutely love the new built-in EVF, is that they costs a lot money.

Shutter Speed30-1/2000 sec30-1/2000 sec30-1/2000 sec
Pop-up FlashYesYesYes
External FlashNoYes (via Multi Interface shoe)No
Burst10 fps

(Speed Priority)

10 fps

(Speed Priority)

10 fps

(Speed Priority)

Exposure Bracketing±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±3±3±3
WB BrackeringYesNoNo
Video1080p60 1080i60 1080p24

720p60/30/24/120

Stereo sound

5-axis image stabilization (first in the series) and Sony's frame analysis technology

MPEG-4, AVCHD, XAVC S

* Supports XAVC S / 50Mbps bit rage. SDXC card with Class 10 or higher is required for XAVC S recording

Clear HDMI output (Preview)

1080p60 1080i60

Stereo sound

MPEG-4, AVCHD

Clear HDMI output (Preview)

1080p60 1080i60

720p30

Stereo sound

MPEG-4, AVCHD

Clear HDMI output (Preview)

The RX100 III takes the video functionality into a new level. You can now record video at both 60p and 24p, enjoy significantly better stabilization using the 5-axis image stabilization and the ability to record videos at 50 Mbps. This means better image quality (although larger files), but I'm sure that video enthusiasts will be very excited to have and take advantage of this function.
Microphone Port/ Headphone JackNo / NoNo / NoNo / No
Non of the cameras feature a mic input nor a headphone input.

You can buy the Sony ECM-XYST1M stereo microphone that can be attached to the Multi-interface shoe of the M2, and can significantly improve the audio of your videos.

WirelessWi-Fi / NFCWi-Fi / NFCEye-Fi card compatible
Both the RX100 M2 and RX100 M3 have Wi-Fi and NFC, which make it easy to share image via your mobile device (iPhone, Android phone or tablet) or remote control the camera ('one-touch remote') via your mobile device.
AF Points25 contrast-detect AF points25 contrast-detect AF points25 contrast-detect AF points
Eye AFYesNoNo
PlayMemories SupportYesYesYes
Battery Life320 shots (CIPA)350 shots (CIPA)330 shots (CIPA)
Weight290 g (0.64 lb / 10.23 oz)281 g (0.62 lb / 9.91 oz)240 g (0.53 lb / 8.47 oz)
Dimensions102 x 58 x 41 mm (4.02 x 2.28 x 1.61″)102 x 58 x 38 mm (4 x 2.29 x 1.51″)102 x 58 x 36 mm (4 x 2.29 x 1.41″)
PriceCheck on Amazon.comCheck on Amazon.comCheck on Amazon.com

Conclusion

You can clearly see from the above comparison table, that the new RX100 III is the best among three (as expected of course), but also positioned itself as a well-worthy upgrade for people who own the previous model. If I had the RX100 II, I think that I would certainly upgrade to the M3 RX 100 III camera for its EVF, XAVC video format and faster optics.  The RX100 III image quality also expected to be better do to the new image processor.

I think that Sony will eventually recreate the success of its first RX100 all over again.  The 3-stop ND filter, Zebra pattern and focus peaking function, NFC/Wi-Fi, faster lens, pop-up OLED EVF, 180-degree tiltable LCD, very good battery life, customizable front lens ring, etc — this is the mother of all compact cameras!

The RX100 III drops the Multi-Interface shoe connected, leaving you with no option to connect and external stereo mic or attach an external flash. I think that most people who buy a compact camera couldn’t care less. They search for a pocketable camera that they can take everywhere they go, and want Sony to focus on features that are most important for such cameras. I think that exactly what Sony has focus on and it delivered an exceptional large-sensor compact camera that the competition will have a very tough time competing against.

I also think that some people who previously planned buying a mirrorless camera, might even consider buying the RX100 III instead.

What’s your opinion? — share your opinion by leaving a comment in the comment section below. Thanks for reading and please don’t forget to like and share!

 

Related posts:

  1. Sony RX100 Overheating Problem – Proof?
  2. Sony A65 vs A77 Comparison – What are the Differences?
  3. Sony RX100 or DSLR
  4. Sony Cyber-shot RX100 II (RX100M2) vs RX100 – Features and Image Quality Comparison
  5. Why Should You Buy Sony RX100?
  6. Canon Rebel T4i / 650D vs Sony NEX-5R vs RX100 – Comparison Review
  7. Sony RX100 vs Canon S100 Comparison – The Best Compact Camera
  8. Canon PowerShot G1 X vs Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 Comparison
  9. Canon PowerShot S110 vs Sony RX100 Comparison

www.cameradebate.com

Sony RX100 M3 vs RX100 M2 Specifications Comparison

Sony has announced the 1″-type sensor Cyber-shot DSC RX100 III digital compact camera. Sony RX100 M3 vs RX100 M2 specifications comparison table can be seen below.

To see the difference between Sony RX100 M3 vs RX100 M2 digital compact cameras we have put together RX100 M3 vs RX100 M2 specs comparison table below.

The Sony RX100 III features the same 20.1 megapixel back-illuminated 1.0-type Exmor R CMOS sensor as the RX100 II, the latest Bionz X processor, a pop-up electronic viewfinder and a faster 24-70mm F1.8-2.8 lens. See First Impressions, Hands-on Videos, Samples and RX100 III Sample Images.

Sony RX100 M3 vs RX100 M2 Specifications Comparison

Below you can see the specs comparison table of Sony RX100 M3 vs RX100 M2 digital compact cameras. Some differences like sensor, image size, shooting speed, lcd size etc.. detailed as bold on the table.

Sony RX100 M3 is a faster camera because it features the new Bionz X image processor which is approx three times faster than the Bionz image processor of RX100 M2 camera. Sony RX100 M3 has 2.9X optical zoom only and Sony RX100 M2 has 3.6X optical zoom.

The RX100 III’s zoom now extends across a 24-70mm equivalent range, with a fast maximum aperture of F1.8-2.8, a great improvement on the 28-100mm, F1.8-4.9 lenses sported by the existing models. So which one to buy? For a $100 difference it is better to go with the new model.

Feature RX100 III RX100 II
Sensor Resolution 20 Million 20 Million
Sensor Type BSI-CMOS CMOS
Sensor Size 13.2 x 8.8 mm 13.2 x 8.8 mm
Sensor Size 1″ 1″
Image Size 5472 x 3648 5472 x 3648
Image Processor Bionz X Bionz
Viewfinder Type Electronic Electronic
Viewfinder Coverage 100%
Storage Media SD/SDHC/SDXC, Memory Stick Duo/Pro Duo/Pro-HG Duo SD/SDHC/SDXC, Memory Stick Duo/Pro Duo/Pro-HG Duo
Continuous Shooting Speed 10 FPS 10 FPS
Max Shutter Speed 1/2000 to 30 sec 1/2000 to 30 sec
Native ISO Sensitivity ISO 125-12,800 ISO 160-12,800
Autofocus System 25 points 25 points
Video Output MPEG-4, AVCHD, XAVC S MPEG-4, AVCHD
Video Maximum Resolution 1920 x 1080 (60p/60i/24p) 1920 x 1080 (60 fps)
LCD Size 3.0″ Tilting TFT-LCD 3.0″ Tilting TFT-LCD
LCD Resolution 1,440,000 dots 1,229,000 dots
Built-in GPS No No
Battery NP-BX1 NP-BX1
Battery Life 320 shots (CIPA) 350 shots (CIPA)
USB Version 2.0 2.0
Dimensions 102 x 58 x 41 mm 102 x 58 x 38 mm
Weight 290g 281g
MSRP Price $798 $698

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III Price & Availability

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III digital camera price is 799.00. The RX100 III available from the camera stores below.

Buy Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III Digital Camera
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III $799.00 Amazon | Adorama |ebay

Like this:

Like Loading...

www.dailycameranews.com

Sony RX100 M3 vs Sony RX100 M2 « NEW CAMERA

By admin, on May 19th, 2014

The RX100M3 is a successor of RX100 M2 camera, take a look below the table to see the major difference…

Sensor: Sony RX100M3 uses same sensor of RX100 M2 camera,  but the image processor and the lens is new (mentioned below) so we may see some improvement in image quality.

Image processor: The BionzX image processor of RX100 M3 camera is approx three times faster than the Bionz image processor of RX100 M2 camera, the image processor is responsible for decoding RAW files to JPEG, AF speed, shutter lag and fast image processor naturally boost the overall operational speed of the camera.

Lenses: The lens losses some optical reach, Sony RX100 M3 able to do 2.9X optical zoom only and Sony RX100 M2 is able  to do 3.6X optical zoom.Improvement in Lens of  RX100 M3 camera:RX100 M3 comes with a improved aperture range – f/1.8 (W) – 2.8 (T) to f/11 on the other hand RX100 M2 aperture range is limited : f/1.8 (W) – 4.9 (T) to f/11, bright aperture lenses delivers more light to the sensor, hence you get more DOF and less noise in your images compared to RX100 M2.The RX100 M3 Tele- close up range is much improved, the RX100 M3 Tele close-up AF range is 30cm on the other hand the RX100 M2 camera close-up range is limited to 55cm.Better Background Blur – Due to close-up tele range the RX100 M3 camera gives very nice / creamy background blur compared to RX100 M2 when portraits are captured at Telephoto end (70 mm).More wide coverage: The new RX100 M2 lens cover more frame compared to RX100 M2 camera (24-70mm vs 28-100 mm).Inside the Lens: The Sony RX100 M3 lens is made up of 10 elements in 9 groups (including 9 aspherical elements), the RX100 M2 lens was made up of 7 elements in 6 groups (including 4 aspherical elements), due to the use of more and high quality aspherical elements,

Video: The frame rate remains same but new XAVC S recording format added (same as Sony A7s camera), audio recording format also get a facelift by adding Linear PCM (Pulse-code modulation – 2 channel).

Introduction of OLED pop-up viewfinder: The 0.39″ 1,440k-dot SVGA OLED Tru-Finder EVF added by Sony in RX100 M3 camera, the EVF’s optics feature a Zeiss T* anti-reflective coating to enhance visibility, the viewfinder also features eye sensor to detect your eye position.

The Hot-shoe is removed by Sony, it may bring disappointment to professional photographers since now there is no option left to use external flash or micro-phone.

Verdict: The RX100 M3 does have improved lens, new image processor, pop-up viewfinder and highest level of (XAVC S) video recording format available, but the sensor remains same as RX100 M2 camera, the RX100 M2 users may wait (if you feel these improvements are not enough for you) for Sony RX100 M4 camera but for new users we highly recommend you to buy Sony RX100 M3.

Buy Pre-order RX100 M3 at Amazon | B&H |

thenewcamera.com


Смотрите также